High Adventure Team Patch

GLAAC-HAT
High Adventure Awards Program


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Extracted from Hike Aid 6, dated May 2017
Note: In the event of a conflict between this web page and the Hike Aid, the Hike Aid takes precedence.


Table of Contents

Introduction

"Must we always teach our children with books? Let them look at the stars and the mountains above. Let them look at the waters and the trees and flowers on Earth. Then they will begin to think, and to think is the beginning of a real education." - David Polis

High Adventure awards are sponsored by the Greater Los Angeles Area Council - Boy Scouts of America, through the High Adventure Team (GLAAC-HAT), to stimulate interest and participation in a variety of outdoor activities and to recognize individual and Unit accomplishments. The awards program is an important feature of Scouting, continuing a practice begun by Lord Baden-Powell, that was based upon his experiences in the British Army. The "brag rag", upon which these awards may be displayed, is aptly named, and everyone deserves no less or more than they have earned by participating in your Unit's High Adventure Program.

The pursuit of these awards, however, must not become an end in itself. Their purpose is to expand and enhance the Unit's Scouting program. Developing Scouting, Venturing, and outdoor skills, promoting environmental awareness, and providing meaningful and enjoyable experiences for each participant are primary. The Unit Leadership should plan its High Adventure Program to achieve these objectives, as compatible with the abilities and interests of all of its members. The awards will follow, many of them and of great variety. The GLAAC-HAT, on its own, sponsors over 40 different, on-going High Adventure awards. The total number sponsored by the Councils in Southern California and adjacent areas are at least five times that. Practically all of them are available for members of your Unit to earn. Any of them may be earned several times.

GLAAC-HAT sponsored awards are given only for participation in Unit or District/Council contingent sponsored activities, to persons who are registered with the Boy Scouts of America at the time of the activity. The reason for this is fundamental to the purpose of having these awards - to encourage participation as a Unit, in Unit-sponsored High Adventure activities.

This Hike Aid brings into a single document all of the information that the Unit Leadership needs to know about the GLAAC-HAT High Adventure Awards Program. Besides identifying the awards and their requirements, it covers how to get them, recordkeeping, displaying them, etc. Also included is a brief discussion of the awards programs of other local Councils. GLAAC-HAT Hike Aid 15, "Long-Term Trekking", and Hike Aid 16, "Peak Bagging: Program and Awards" contain additional information about the awards that are specific to those activities.



Categories of Awards

The GLAAC-HAT sponsors High Adventure awards to promote a diversity of outdoor activities in Southern California and its surrounding deserts and mountain ranges. The awards are categorized as backpacking, peak bagging, conservation, climbing, and special recognition. All of those discussed here are on-going. The GLAAC-HAT occasionally sponsors one-time awards to recognize special events or activities.

Awards in the backpacking category are earned for a trip as short as five miles, with one night of camping, and as long as 50+ miles and a week or more duration. Their purpose is to encourage the Unit to build its backpacking program to meet the challenges of year-round, longterm, and diversity. Several different awards may apply to some backpack trips; however, each participant may receive only one, whether it is sponsored by the GLAAC-HAT or by another Council. The participants on a given trip don't all have to be given the same award, it's just that each is to receive only one. The GLAAC-HAT currently sponsors 15 backpacking awards, one having two segments and another having six.

The Peak Bagger and Mini-Peak Bagger award programs recognize peak climbing in a variety of locations and conditions. Participants in this activity experience the challenge and the exhilaration of reaching the summit. Peaks may be climbed as a day hike, or as part of a backpack trip of any duration. Peak climbing credit toward these awards is in addition to, and independent of, an award for the backpack trip. The awards in these two series are for a cumulative number of peak climbs from specified lists. All peaks may be climbed without the use of technical climbing equipment and do not fall under the BSA-National Council program, Climb On Safely. Eight patches are available to be earned.

The conservation award program is, in part, the product of the 50 year collaboration between the GLAAC-HAT and the USDA Forest Service. There are two award series, TrailSaver and ForestSaver, each with four patches and a medal, which are earned on a cumulative hour basis. There are also two special conservation awards.

The GLAAC-HAT initiated an award for climbing in the summer of 2005. The award is in recognition of the interest in technical climbing and is to encourage it beyond the basic merit badge. All such activity must be in compliance with Climb On Safely.

The special recognition awards sponsored by the GLAAC-HAT are for outstanding individual and Unit High Adventure achievement. There are currently six such awards: Silver Moccasins Medal, Backpacker, Advanced Backpacker, Master TrailBuilder, Lyle N. Whited Hiking Award, and Jim Hawkins Mountaineering Award.

One-time awards are sponsored to recognize participation in a unique activity or occurrence. They are announced through a special Program Announcement and in The Trail Head. The announcement will cover the reason for it being offered, the requirements to be met, the duration for which it will be offered, and how to obtain the award. In recent years, the GLAAC-HAT has sponsored one-time High Adventure awards in recognition of the Mt. Baden-Powell Trail Restoration Program (1991-1993), the Silver Moccasins fiftieth anniversary (1997-1998), and the one-hundredth anniversary of the founding of the Boy Scouts of America (2007-2014).



Awards Requirements

All of the requirements for an GLAAC-HAT sponsored High Adventure award are to be met by the recipient and Unit before it may be presented to him/her. That this basic rule is followed is a matter of trust and of the integrity of the Unit Leadership.

Ther following set of General Requirements apply to all High Adventure activities. Satisfying them should become a matter of routine to your outdoor program. As you read them, you will find that their underlying purpose is to promote a safe and enjoyable High Adventure experience. These General Requirements must be fulfilled by the Unit Leadership for its members to qualify for any High Adventure award sponsored by the GLAAC-HAT and by most other local Councils.

General Requirements

  1. Prepare and document a plan for the activity. For backpacking trips this will generally include preparing the Trail Profile/Trail Schedule.
  2. Obtain and be familiar with the contents of Guide to Safe Scouting, issued by BSA-National Council, and the Hike Aids, issued by the GLAAC-HAT. Visit http://glaac-hat.org for the latest Hike Aids.
  3. Obtain all other permits and reservations, e.g., fire, wilderness, as required for the location of the activity.
  4. Have a signed Consent to Participate and Consent to Obtain Emergency Medical Treatment form for each Scout participant.
  5. BSA-National Council policy is that every sanctioned Scout activity must include a minimum of two adults, one of whom must be 21, and two Scouts. This requirement applies only to Conservation awards. The GLAAC-HAT requirement for earning all other High Adventure awards is that there be at least two adults and three Scouts on each outing or in each hiking group or crew.
  6. At least one participating adult must hold current American Red Cross (ARC) Community (or more advanced) First Aid and CPR Certifications or equivalent.
  7. Require that the participants carry all food and equipment for the activity, without the use of pack animals or mechanical conveyance. Food drops are not allowed unless otherwise noted.
  8. Practice Leave No Trace camping and hiking techniques; pick up and pack out your own and other persons' trash.
  9. Count only backpack miles or hours in meeting the requirements for any backpacking award.
  10. One Trip, One Award - In general, only one award may be earned on one outing, unless stated in writing in the award requirements. Example: The Western Los Angeles County Council "14,495 Club Mt. Whitney Climb" award may be earned with other awards as part of a long-term trek.
  11. When award approval is required, the approval cannot be by an award participant.

The individual who is to receive the award is to be registered with the BSA at the time of the activity and is to have satisfied the Specific Requirements for it. It is strongly recommended that all adults who participate in High Adventure activities have completed BSA-conducted Adult Leaders Backpack Training, hold current ARC Community First Aid and CPR Certifications or equivalent, and have had a full physical examination within the current year (BSA Annual Health and Medical Record).

Each award has one or more specific requirements. They differentiate the awards and provide the special challenges. All awards that are sponsored by the GLAAC-HAT may be earned by all Scouts and Scouters, subject to their Council's HAT. Long-term backpacking and conservation awards require GLAAC-HAT approval in advance of the activity. A Unit in another Council that desires such an award may seek this approval from its Council's HAT. If the Council has no HAT, GLAAC-HAT approval is to be obtained.

Note: In 2015 the Los Angeles Area Council (LAAC) and San Gabriel Valley Council merged into the Greater Los Angeles Area Council (GLAAC). All work done towards High Adventure Awards from either Council prior to this merger can be used towards GLAAC-HAT awards.



High Adventure Awards

Each of the on-going awards sponsored by the GLAAC-HAT is listed on the following pages, and its specific requirements are discussed. The awards are grouped within the categories previously described.


Backpacking

The GLAAC-HAT Hike Aid 4, "High Adventure Procedures and Guidelines" presents the fundamentals of a High Adventure program. Being familiar with its contents is a necessary step in becoming trained as a leader of backpacking trips. Among other topics, the several forms and planning processes identified as required for earning many of these awards are discussed in detail in this brochure.

Unit leadership should plan and conduct its backpacking program through the use of Trail Camps and "dispersed site" camping opportunities, rather than the use of campgrounds, i.e. drive-in campsites. Besides the less than wilderness experience that campgrounds provide, most of those in the local mountains are very crowded on weekends, restrict the number of persons in a campsite, and charge a camping fee. Trail Camps and dispersed sites, while sometimes crowded, promote High Adventure and the development of Scouting and outdoor skills. Strict observation of "The Outdoor Code" and Leave No Trace are mandatory in those locations.

Scheduled hours of backpacking are based upon the planning criteria of one hour per two miles or 1,000 feet of elevation gain, while carrying a full backpack. Day hike mileage and elevation gain do not apply to any GLAAC-HAT sponsored backpacking awards. Certain awards have a specific requirement for the award recipient to have earned weekend awards. For this purpose, weekend awards are the National Forest, the National Park, and the California State Park awards. However, GLAAC-HAT sponsored awards which require more than seven scheduled hours and awards sponsored by other Councils which include a requirement of backpacking time of seven or more scheduled hours may be substituted.

Each participant must satisfy all of the Specific Requirements for an award, as well as the Unit satisfying all of the previously mentioned General Requirements. All applications for a backpacking award with a requirement of four or more days must be approved in advance by an authorized member of the GLAAC-HAT.


Training HikeTraining Hike Patch

  1. Backpack may be taken in any location.
  2. Minimum of one night of camping.
  3. Backpack distance of five or more miles.
  4. No mileage offset for elevation gain.

National ForestNational Forest Patch

  1. Campsite and at least half of the scheduled hours hiked must be in a National Forest.
  2. Backpack time of seven or more scheduled hours.
  3. Minimum of one night of camping.
  4. Award recipient to have previously earned two Training Hike awards.

National ParkNational Park Patch

  1. Campsite and at least half of the scheduled hours hiked must be in a National Park or National Monument.
  2. Backpack time of seven or more scheduled hours.
  3. Minimum of one night of camping.
  4. Award recipient to have previously earned two Training Hike awards.

California State ParkState Park Patch

  1. Campsite and at least half of the scheduled hours hiked must be in a California State Park or Forest or on Catalina Island.
  2. Backpack time of seven or more scheduled hours.
  3. Minimum of one night of camping.
  4. Award recipient to have previously earned two Training Hike awards.

Snow HikeSnow Hike Patch

  1. May be taken in any location.
  2. Trail and campsite must be snow-covered.
  3. Prepare at least two meals in camp.
  4. Minimum of one night of camping.
  5. Backpack distance of five or more miles.
  6. No mileage offset for elevation gain.
  7. Award recipient to have previously earned two training hike awards.
  8. Recommended that participating Scouts be 13 or older.
  9. At least one participating adult must have completed BSA-conducted Winter Camping and Travel training.

GabrielinoGabriellino Patch

This award was designed for backpacking anywhere on the Gabrielino National Recreation Trail, that goes from Chantry Flats to Windsor Drive, Altadena.

  1. Trail and campsites must be in the Angeles National Forest.
  2. Three days, two nights minimum duration.
  3. Backpack time of 12 or more scheduled hours.
  4. Award recipient to have earned two weekend awards within 90 days prior to trek.
  5. Perform six hours of GLAAC-HAT approved conservation work applied to earning a TrailSaver or ForestSaver award in the Angeles National Forest within 90 days before or after the hike.

Golden Eaglet Mini-Long Term Pre-approval requiredGolden Eaglet Patch

  1. May be taken on any public lands.
  2. Four days, three nights minimum duration; one layover day in addition is recommended.
  3. Backpack time of 16 or more scheduled hours.
  4. Award recipient to have earned two weekend or equivalent awards within 90 days prior to trek.
  5. Participating Scouts must be 12 or older.
  6. Each participant must have had a medical examination using BSA Annual Health and Medical Record within one year prior to trek. It is strongly recommended that each be current as to a tetanus shot.
  7. At least one participating adult must have completed BSA-conducted Adult Leaders Backpack Training.
  8. Secure GLAAC-HAT approval at least one month prior to departure. Submit a High Adventure Award Application, Trail Profile, Trail Schedule, menu, and all other relevant planning materials.

Golden Bighorn High Adventure Backpack Pre-approval requiredGolden Bighorn Patch

Take a backpack on the Santa Ana River Trail around Barton Flats, then back through the San Gorgonio Wilderness to Angeles Oaks.

  1. This special long-term backpack award is earned by hiking the route in the San Bernardino National Forest that is specified in the GLAAC-HAT Hike Aid 15, "Long-Term Trekking". Route modifications or substitute locations are not permitted.
  2. Five days, four nights minimum duration; one layover day in addition is recommended.
  3. Backpacking distance is either 39 miles with 6,200 feet of elevation gain, or 52 miles with 7,200 feet of elevation gain, depending on the trailhead.
  4. One food drop is permitted, at the time and place of your choice.
  5. Award recipient to have earned two weekend or equivalent awards within 90 days prior to trek.
  6. Participating Scouts must be 12 or older; it is recommended that they be 13 or older.
  7. Each participant must have had a medical examination using BSA Annual Health and Medical Record within a year prior to trek. It is strongly recommended that each be current as to a tetanus shot.
  8. At least one participating adult must have completed BSA-conducted Adult Leaders Backpack Training.
  9. Secure GLAAC-HAT approval at least one month prior to departure. Submit a High Adventure Award Application, Trail Profile, Trail Schedule, menu, and all other relevant planning materials.

Please refer to the GLAAC-HAT Hike Aid 15, "Long-Term Trekking", for additional information.


High Adventure Backpack Pre-approval requiredHigh Adventure Patch

  1. May be taken on any public lands.
  2. Five days, four night minimum duration; one layover day in addition is recommended.
  3. Backpack time of 25 or more scheduled hours.
  4. One food drop is permitted, at the time and place of your choice.
  5. Award recipient to have earned two weekend or equivalent awards within 90 days prior to trek.
  6. Participating Scouts must be 12 or older; it is recommended that they be 13 or older.
  7. Each participant must have had a medical examination using BSA Annual Health and Medical Record within a year prior to trek. It is strongly recommended that each be current as to a tetanus shot.
  8. At least one participating adult must have completed BSA-conducted Adult Leaders Backpack Training.
  9. Secure GLAAC-HAT approval at least one month prior to departure. Submit a High Adventure Award Application, Trail Profile, Trail Schedule, menu, and all other relevant planning materials.

John Muir Trail Award Pre-approval requiredJohn Muir Patches

The following specific requirements apply for earning the primary patch and each of the Segments.

  1. Take a backpack on the John Muir Trail, to include that section specified on the Segment sought and to begin and end at the locations indicated below.
    • Yosemite Valley - Red's Meadow
    • Red's Meadow - Rock Creek
    • Rock Creek - North Lake
    • North Lake - South Lake
    • South Lake - Onion Valley
    • Onion Valley - Whitney Portal, with an optional side trip to the summit of Mt. Whitney
  2. Seven days, six nights minimum duration; one layover day in addition is recommended.
  3. Backpack distances are in the range of 50 miles per Segment.
  4. Award recipient to have earned two weekend or equivalent awards within 90 days prior to trek.
  5. Participating Scouts must be 12 or older; it is recommended that they be 13 or older.
  6. Each participant must have had a medical examination using BSA Annual Health and Medical Record within a year prior to trek. It is strongly recommended that each be current as to a tetanus shot.
  7. At least one participating adult must have completed BSA-conducted Adult Leaders Backpack Training.
  8. Secure GLAAC-HAT approval at least one month prior to departure. Submit a High Adventure Award Application, Trail Profile, Trail Schedule, menu, and all other relevant planning materials.

The John Muir Trail Patch is awarded only once, when the initial Segment is earned. Routes may be hiked in either direction and in any sequence. Please refer to GLAAC-HAT Hike Aid 15, "Long-Term Trekking", for additional information.


High Sierra Trail Pre-approval requiredHigh Sierra Patches

The following specific requirements apply for earning the primary patch and either Segment.

  1. Award recipient to have earned two weekend or equivalent awards within 90 days prior to trek.
  2. Participating Scouts must be 12 or older; it is recommended that they be 13 or older.
  3. Each participant must have had a medical examination using BSA Annual Health and Medical Record within a year prior to trek. It is strongly recommended that each be current as to a tetanus shot.
  4. At least one participating adult must have completed BSA-conducted Adult Leaders Backpack Training.
  5. Secure GLAAC-HAT approval at least one month prior to departure. Submit a High Adventure Award Application, Trail Profile, Trail Schedule, menu, and all other relevant planning materials.

The High Sierra Patch is awarded only once, when the initial Segment is earned. Routes may be hiked in either direction and in any sequence. Please refer to the GLAAC-HAT Hike Aid 15, "Long-Term Trekking", for additional information.

Giant Forest to Mineral King

  1. Trailheads are at either Crescent Meadow or Wolverton and end at Mineral King.
  2. Six days, five nights minimum duration; one layover day in addition is recommended.
  3. Backpack time of 25 or more scheduled hours (usual route is 44 miles, with 7,500 foot elevation gain - 30 scheduled hours).

Mineral King to Mt. Whitney

  1. 1) Trailheads are at Mineral King and end at Whitney Portal, with an optional side trip to the summit of Mt. Whitney.
  2. Seven days, six nights minimum duration; one layover day in addition is recommended.
  3. Backpack time of 25 or more scheduled hours (usual route is 52 miles, with 12,000 foot elevation gain - 38 hours).

Sierra North Pre-approval requiredSierra North Patch

  1. Trail must be entirely within the portion of the Sierras bounded on the north by Highway 88 (the southern boundary of El Dorado County) and on the south by an imagined east-west line just below Lake Thomas A. Edison.
  2. Five days, four nights minimum duration; one layover day in addition is recommended.
  3. Backpack time of 25 or more scheduled hours.
  4. Award recipient to have earned two weekend or equivalent awards within 90 days prior to trek.
  5. Participating Scouts must be 12 or older; it is recommended that they be 13 or older.
  6. Each participant must have had a medical examination using BSA Annual Health and Medical Record within a year prior to trek. It is strongly recommended that each be current as to a tetanus shot.
  7. At least one participating adult must have completed BSA-conducted Adult Leaders Backpack Training.
  8. Secure GLAAC-HAT approval at least one month prior to departure. Submit a High Adventure Award Application, Trail Profile, Trail Schedule, menu, and all other relevant planning materials.

Sierra South Pre-approval requiredSierra South Patch

  1. Trail must be entirely within the portion of the Sierras bounded on the north by an imagined east-west line just above Lake Thomas A. Edison and on the south by the southern boundary of Kern County.
  2. Five days, four nights minimum duration; one layover day in addition is recommended.
  3. Backpack time of 25 or more scheduled hours.
  4. Award recipient to have earned two weekend or equivalent awards within 90 days prior to trek.
  5. Participating Scouts must be 12 or older; it is recommended that they be 13 or older.
  6. Each participant must have had a medical examination using BSA Annual Health and Medical Record within a year prior to trek. It is strongly recommended that each be current as to a tetanus shot.
  7. At least one participating adult must have completed BSA-conducted Adult Leaders Backpack Training.
  8. Secure GLAAC-HAT approval at least one month prior to departure. Submit a High Adventure Award Application, Trail Profile, Trail Schedule, menu, and all other relevant planning materials.

Silver Moccasins Trail Award Pre-approval requiredSilver Moccasin Patch

The following specific requirements apply, independent of the hiking route selected.

  1. Award recipient to have earned two weekend or equivalent awards within 90 days prior to trek.
  2. Participating Scouts must be 12 or older; it is recommended that they be 13 or older.
  3. Each participant must have had a medical examination using BSA Annual Health and Medical Record within a year prior to trek. It is strongly recommended that each be current as to a tetanus shot.
  4. At least one participating adult must have completed BSA-conducted Adult Leaders Backpack Training.
  5. Secure GLAAC-HAT approval at least one month prior to departure. Submit a High Adventure Award Application, Trail Profile, Trail Schedule, menu, and all other relevant planning materials.

Angeles National Forest Route

  1. Must be taken on the Silver Moccasins Trail, Chantry Flat to Vincent Gap, in the Angeles National Forest.
  2. Six days, five nights minimum, of which one day is a mandatory layover day; one additional layover day is permitted.
  3. Backpack distance is 50 miles, with over 13,000 feet of elevation gain (40 scheduled hours).
  4. Menu accompanying the High Adventure Award Application must note the day(s) of a food drop.
  5. Maximum of two food drops are permitted, at the time and place of your choice.

The Sequoia/Kings Canyon Routes

  1. Must be taken on a specified route in the Silliman Crest or Sugarloaf Valley areas of the Sequoia/Kings Canyon National Parks. See the GLAAC-HAT Hike Aid 15, "Long-Term Trekking", for the required routes.
  2. Five days, four nights minimum duration; one layover day in addition is recommended.
  3. Backpack time of 25 or more scheduled hours.
  4. Food drops are not permitted on these routes.

Please refer to GLAAC-HAT Hike Aid 15, "Long-Term Trekking", for additional information. The Silver Moccasins Medal is discussed In the Special Recognition section of this Hike Aid.


Explorer Mountaineering One Week Backpack Pre-approval requiredExplorer Mountaineering Patch

Units can choose their own route and location for their week long trek. Locations are generally above the 9,000' level and involve several thousand feet of elevation gain or loss per day.

  1. Hike may be taken on any public lands.
  2. Backpack distance of 50 or more miles.
  3. No mileage offset for elevation gain.
  4. Six days, five nights minimum duration; one layover day in addition is recommended.
  5. Award recipient to have earned two weekend or equivalent awards within 90 days prior to trek.
  6. Participants must be 14 years old or older.
  7. Each participant must have had a medical examination using BSA Annual Health and Medical Record within a year prior to trek. It is strongly recommended that each be current as to a tetanus shot.
  8. At least one participating adult must have completed BSA-conducted Adult Leaders Backpack Training.
  9. Secure GLAAC-HAT approval at least one month prior to departure. Submit a High Adventure Award Application, Trail Profile, Trail Schedule, menu, and all other relevant planning materials.

Peak Bagging

The two peak bagging award programs which are sponsored by the GLAAC-HAT are intended to encourage the Unit to extend the nature and range of its High Adventure program. Peak climbing credit towards earning them is additional to any backpacking award which may be earned on a given outing. In other words, you can do a weekend backpack on Mt. San Gorgonio, climb the summit, and, provided that they satisfy its specific requirements, give participants the National Forest award and peak climbing credit for the Peak Bagger award. A given peak may be climbed only once for credit for earning an award in either of these programs.


Mini-Peak BaggerMini Peak Bagger Patches

This award program is designed to introduce Units to backcountry peak climbing. Units can earn the awards in the Southern California mountain regions that are within easy reach for one-day outings. It is hoped that the Unit will see mini-peak climbing as an opportunity to supplement its weekend or short-term backpacking program. Approved peaks have elevations of between 5,000 to 10,000 feet and require minimal off-trail or cross country hiking.

A maximum of three peaks may be climbed for credit on a single outing; however, only two may be climbed on a single day. All eligible peaks are located in Southern California. An award is earned when 8, 16, and 24 (cumulative) different peaks from the approved list are climbed, and the other specific requirements are met. The following specific requirements apply to each award in this series:

  1. All outings that include a peak climb must satisfy all of the General Requirements listed in the Awards Requirements section of this Hike Aid.
  2. Climb eight different approved peaks, with a maximum of three per outing, and two per day.
  3. It is recommended that each Scout do two hours of work or study on an applicable merit badge or Scouting skill during each outing.
  4. Perform six hours of GLAAC-HAT approved conservation work allied to earning a TrailSaver or Forest Conservation award. It may be performed at any time, independent of the peak climbs.
  5. Pick up and pack out any trash from the trail or campsites along the way.
  6. Maintain and submit a roster for each participant which identifies the peak and date climbed, and the date and location for the conservation work.
  7. Obtain GLAAC-HAT approval before applying for Mini-Peak Bagger awards.

Please refer to the GLAAC-HAT Hike Aid 16, "Peak Bagging: Program and Awards", for additional information, a more complete discussion of these requirements, and a listing of the eligible peaks. The Mini-Peak Bagger Award Record is suggested for keeping track of individual participation and applying for an award.


Peak BaggerPeak Bagger Patches

This award program is designed to stimulate a greater appreciation of the beauty, peace and majesty of the alpine wilderness. Each peak on the approved list has been carefully selected so that a variety of locations are reached, using backpacking rather than technical climbing skills. However, careful planning is still mandatory before climbing any of them. To quote from a Sierra Club film, "The mountain's don't care".

Your trip planning will normally provide for climbing one peak on a short term (less than five days) outing and two peaks on a long-term (five or more days) outing. Under certain circumstances, and in advance of the trip, the GLAAC-HAT does grant approval to climb an additional peak for credit on an outing. However, only one peak may be climbed in a single day. Most of the approved peaks are located in the Sierra Nevada and the San Bernardino Mountains. Most have an elevation of over 10,000 feet and each present a unique challenge.

An award is earned when 5,10,15, 20, and 25 (cumulative) different peaks from the approved list are climbed, and the other specific requirements are met. The following specific requirements apply to each award:

  1. All outings that include a peak climb must satisfy all of the General Requirements listed in the Awards Requirements section of this Hike Aid.
  2. Each participant is to have earned two weekend or equivalent awards before beginning to climb peaks that qualify for these awards.
  3. Climb five different, approved peaks, limited to one per day, with a maximum of two per long-term outing.
  4. Pick up and pack out any trash from the trail or campsite along the way.
  5. Maintain and submit a roster for each participant which identifies the peak and date climbed.
  6. Obtain GLAAC-HAT approval before applying for the Senior (20 peak) and Mountaineer (25 peak) awards.

Please refer to the GLAAC-HAT Hike Aid 16, "Peak Bagging: Program and Awards", for additional information, a more complete discussion of these requirements, and a listing of the eligible peaks. Use the Peak Bagger Award Record to keep track of individual participation and for applying for an award.


Conservation

These awards were developed by the GLAAC-HAT, in concert with the USDA-FS, to promote Unit participation in forest and trail conservation and construction projects. The initial award program, TrailSaver, was adopted in 1982 as a special activity to be offered for two years. It proved so successful that it was made permanent and has led to the adoption of a second award program, ForestSaver. All conservation work must have the prior approval by the GLAAC-HAT as to what, where, when, and how from the proper USDA-Forest Service representative, or administrator for a location other than a National Forest. All work must be done under the direction of a person, typically a Trail Boss, assigned by that representative. Units in other Councils may request other arrangements, depending upon their location.

Awards in these programs are earned when the participant performs 6,12,18, 24, and 30 hours of GLAAC-HAT approved conservation work. Unit Leadership must also satisfy these General Requirements for the outing:

  1. Have a signed Consent to Participate and Consent to Obtain Emergency Medical Treatment form for each Scout participant.
  2. Observe the BSA-National Council rule of a minimum of two registered adults, one of whom must be 21, and two Scouts.
  3. At least one participating adult must hold current ARC Community (or more advanced) First Aid and CPR Certifications or equivalent.

Each conservation award earned may be used to qualify a person for at most one other GLAAC- HAT award. This restriction does not apply to concurrent awards such as the Lyle N. Whited Hiking Award, the Jim Hawkins Mountaineering Award, and the Jim Spencer Conservation Award.

Conservation hours performed to meet the requirements for another Council's conservation award may not be used to also qualify the person for a GLAAC-HAT conservation award.

Hours performed to meet the advancement requirements for Star, Life, and Eagle ranks may not be used to also qualify the person for a GLAAC-HAT conservation award, and vice versa. However, all other persons who work on an Eagle project may receive conservation award credit for the hours performed.

All applications for a conservation award must be approved by an authorized member of the GLAAC-HAT.


TrailSaverTrailsaver Awards

The TrailSaver program was developed in 1983, in coordination with Forest Service personnel in the Arroyo Seco District of the Angeles National Forest, to replace an awards program for trail conservation that had been in place for many years. This award program recognizes individual participation in trail construction and maintenance projects. This participation can be as part of a Unit service project or an Eagle project. The awards are earned in six hour increments, on a cumulative basis:

Please refer to the GLAAC-HAT Hike Aid 7, "Forest and Trail Conservation", for additional information about this program. The Conservation Award Log is used to obtain awards.


ForestSaverTrailsaver Awards

The ForestSaver program was developed in 1993 to recognize individual participation in forestry and associated construction and maintenance projects. This award program recognizes individual participation in forestry and associated construction and maintenance projects. This participation can be as part of a Unit service project or an Eagle project. There are three categories of projects:

◊ Campsite: campground or trail camp development, improvement, maintenance, and rehabilitation.
◊ Wildlife: habitat restoration, browse-way improvement, construction and maintenance of feeders and waterers, etc.
◊ Forestry: plantation clearing, tree planting, tree thinning and pruning, etc.

Awards are earned on the following basis:
◊ Campsite Award: six hours of effort in that category.
◊ Wildlife Award: six hours of effort in that category.
◊ Forestry Award: six hours of effort in that category.
◊ ForestSaver Award: earn the Campsite, Wildlife, and Forestry Awards and do an additional six hours of ForestSaver project work.
◊ ForestSaver Medal: earn the ForestSaver Award and do an additional six hours of ForestSaver project work.

The six hour projects for the ForestSaver Award and Medal may be in any of the three categories and may be performed at any time. Please refer to the GLAAC-HAT Hike Aid 7, "Forest and Trail Conservation"; for additional information about this program. The Conservation Award Log is used to obtain awards.


Trail Boss Service PinTrail Boss Service Pin

This award is given to Scouters by the Forest/Trail Conservation Committee of the GLAAC-HAT. It is earned when the Scouter accomplishes the following tasks:

  1. Certified Trail Boss (please refer to the GLAAC-HAT Hike Aid 7, "Forest and Trail Conservation", for information).
  2. Oversees two additional trail conservation projects, each of a minimum of six hours, in the Angeles National Forest.

Jim Spencer Conservation AwardJim Spencer Pennant

In the fall of 1991, the GLAAC-HAT announced the Jim Spencer Conservation Award to recognize the accomplishments of its long-time member, Jim Spencer. Jim worked with the U.S. Forest Service to develop and implement the Trail Boss training program which has subsequently spread nationwide. He was also instrumental in the creation of the GLAAC-HAT sponsored TrailSaver and ForestSaver Award programs.

This award, which honors his accomplishments, is a Unit award. It is earned when the following specific requirements are satisfied:

  1. Members of the Unit have performed a total of 1,000, 2,000, or 5,000 cumulative hours of on-site work on High Adventure Team approved conservation projects.
    1. Hours performed on all such projects since 1980 qualify for this award.
    2. All qualifying hours apply, regardless of the awards or advancements earned by the individual participants on the projects.
  2. The Unit has a registered leader who is a Certified Trail Boss.

Use the Jim Spencer Conservation Award Application to obtain this award. The award is a ribbon, to be displayed on the Unit's flag. A different colored ribbon recognizes each level - 1000, 2000, or 5000 hours of conservation work.


Climbing

This award is offered to stimulate the development of skills and in appreciation of climbing beyond those required to earn the Climbing merit badge. This award may be earned by Cub, Webelos, Boy Scouts, and Venturers as noted.

Please be advised that all climbing involves risks that the individual and his leaders assume when they participate in these activities.
  1. Rock Climbing AwardPlan and complete each outing in compliance with these BSA-National Council programs:
    1. Follow the Eight Points of Climb on Safely.
    2. Follow the Seven Principles of Leave No Trace.
  2. Make 2 climbs and 2 descents.
    1. Cubs and Webelos: Descents must be down-climbs.
    2. Boy Scouts and Venturers: One descent must be a rappel; the second may be either a rappel or a down-climb.
  3. Location of all climbs and descents:
    1. Cubs and Webelos: May only use artificial walls.
    2. Boy Scouts and Venturers: Must be outdoors on real rock.

This is a concurrent award. Boy Scouts and Venturers may use climbs and rappels taken to earn Climbing merit badge to earn this award. The outings may apply to earning other outdoor awards.

A climb may be either a top-rope or a bouldering problem. Lead climbing is not allowed. A rappel is defined as a Scout moving down a stationary rope in full self-control. The person on rappel must be belayed either by a second rope or by a "fireman's belay". If the belayer is in control of the speed, the descent does not count as a rappel. A down-climb is similar to an up-climb, only the person is descending

Prepare a High Adventure Award Application and submit it to the Scout Shop to purchase this award. List the names of the persons that have earned it. Attach a note which shows the following for each outing taken to earn the award: date, location, names of Climbing Instructors, Climbing Directors, and Instructors-in-Training in attendance.


Special Recognition

These awards are sponsored by the GLAAC to recognize the special accomplishments of an individual. They require participation in several activities, over a period of time.


BackpackerBackpacker Patch

This award recognizes those persons who have earned a long-term backpacking award and have performed GLAAC-HAT approved conservation work in the same calendar year.

  1. Earn a long-term backpacking award (5 or more days).
  2. Perform 12 hours of GLAAC-HAT approved conservation work applied to earning TrailSaver or ForestSaver awards, in the same calendar year as earning the long term backpacking award.
  3. Obtain GLAAC-HAT approval before applying for the Backpacker award.

This award may be worn, as a temporary patch, on the Scout shirt. The Backpacker Award Application is to be used to obtain this award.


Advanced BackpackerAdvanced Backpacker Patch

This award recognizes those persons who have participated in backpacking and conservation activities over an extended period of time.

  1. Earn the Backpacker award.
  2. Earn a long-term backpacking award (5 or more days) in a year subsequent to receiving the Backpacker award.
  3. Perform 12 hours of GLAAC-HAT approved conservation work applied to earning TrailSaver or ForestSaver awards, subsequent to receiving the Backpacker award.
  4. Scouts must have earned Hiking, Camping, and Cooking merit badges.
  5. Scouters must have completed BSA-conducted Adult Leaders Backpack Training.
  6. Obtain GLAAC-HAT approval before applying for the Advanced Backpacker award.

This award may be worn as a temporary patch, on the Scout shirt. The Backpacker Award Application is to be used to obtain this award.


Silver Moccasins MedalSilver Moccasins Medal

This award challenges the backpacker to help construct and maintain the trails on which he/she hikes. It is a unique privilege to hang these Silver Moccasins, when attached to a leather thong, from the right pocket button of the Scout shirt.

  1. Earn the Silver Moccasins Trail Award.
  2. Perform 12 hours of GLAAC-HAT approved and supervised trail conservation work in the Angeles National Forest applied to earning TrailSaver awards. (Out-of-Council Units may request an alternate location from their Council HAT.) Conservation work must be performed in the same calendar year as the Silver Moccasins Trail Award is earned.

Master TrailBuilderMaster TrailBuilder Pin

This award is presented to Scouters by the Forest/Trail Conservation Committee for continued service to the conservation programs of the USFS and the GLAAC-HAT. It is not a matter of meeting a set of requirements, but of dedication to conservation. Jim Spencer was the initial recipient of this award, having set the standard for all of us.


Lyle N. Whited Hiking AwardLyle N. Whited Patch

In September 1990, the Parents' Committee of Troop 211, Torrance, CA, decided to create a special award to recognize the diverse, year-round High Adventure program that the troop had experienced over the prior 20-plus years. As Lyle Whited had served as Assistant Scoutmaster/Hikemaster for over half that period, it also decided to put his name on it. For a number of years, this award was only offered to members of that Unit and of the local District. The GLAAC-HAT is now making it available to anyone who has met its requirements.

  1. 12 hours of Eagle (or equivalent program rank) project work.
  2. 30 hours of trail work (not counting trail work done to satisfy requirement 1).
  3. Earn the GLAAC-HAT 8 Mini-Peak Bagger Award or the GLAAC-HAT 5 Peak Bagger Award.
  4. 150 miles of hiking and backpacking.
  5. 40 nights of camping (backpacking and summer camp).
  6. One long-term backpack trek (4 nights or longer, as part of the miles hiking and nights camping requirements).

The Lyle N. Whited Hiking Award Application is to be used to obtain this award.

This special award may be earned concurrent with, and in addition to, any other High Adventure awards that were granted to satisfy the requirements listed above. The activity required may have occurred at any time while the recipient was affiliated with a Scouting organization.


Jim Hawkins Mountaineering AwardJim Hawkins Medal

This award was developed by Troop 636, Rancho Santa Margarita, and honors Jim Hawkins, chairman of the Los Angeles Area Council High Adventure Team for over 40 years. The upper portion of the medal depicts Dusy Basin in King's Canyon National Park and three creatures that inhabit the Sierra High Country: Yellow-bellied Marmot, Clark's Nutcracker and Golden Trout. The lower portion shows 14,495-foot Mt. Whitney, the highest point in the contiguous 48 states.

  1. Earn any eight weekend High Adventure backpacking awards.
  2. Perform 12 hours of approved conservation work applied to earning any trail building awards.
  3. Earn the GLAAC-HAT 5 Peak Bagger Award.
  4. Earn any two long-term High Adventure backpacking awards (25 or more scheduled backpack hours).
  5. Climb any one of California's fourteeners from the Peak Bagger list, either as a day hike, on a short-term backpack, or on a long-term backpack.
    Mount Langley14,042'Mount Whitney14,495'
    Mount Muir14,015'Mount Williamson14,375'
    Mount Sill14,162'Split Mountain14,058'
    Mount Tyndall14,018'
  6. Earn three of the following merit badges: Backpacking, Camping, Climbing, Hiking, or Wilderness Survival.
Adult Scouters earn this award by completing requirements 1 through 5.
Notes:
1) Peaks on the Peak Bagger list also count towards the Peak Bagger award.
2) If Mt. Whitney is climbed, the "14495 Club" award may also be earned.
Reference:
Climbing California's Fourteeners, S. F. Porcella and C.M. Burns, The Mountaineers, Seattle, WA, 1999

The Jim Hawkins Mountaineering Award Application is to be used to obtain this award.

This special award may be earned concurrent with, and in addition to, any other High Adventure awards that were granted to satisfy the requirements listed above. The activity required may have occurred at any time while the recipient was affiliated with a Scouting organization.



Deviations to Requirements

A High Adventure award is earned when the recipient and Unit have satisfied all of its requirements, as presented in this Hike Aid and as supplemented in Hike Aid 15 and Hike Aid 16. However, the GLAAC-HAT will consider a request for a deviation to a requirement as a consequence of a special need or condition of the recipient or Unit. Such a request must be made in writing to the GLAAC-HAT, at least six weeks prior to the outdoor activity. The request must identify the award to be earned, the requirement for which a deviation is sought, and a detailed reason for requesting the deviation. The GLAAC-HAT will consider the request at its next scheduled meeting and respond in writing. It does not routinely approve requests to climb more peaks than are authorized for an individual outing for the Peak Bagger or Mini-Peak Bagger awards.

A deviation may be for approval of a peak climb that is not on the Peak Bagger or Mini-Peak Bagger award lists, or an alternate approach to an approved peak. Such a request is to be made in the same manner as for any other deviation. Besides the name of the peak, the request must include its exact location, topographical map coverage, elevation, trailhead or route to be used in climbing, distance from the trailhead to the summit, and a comment about the general condition of the trail. This additional information is necessary to assess the suitability of the peak for qualifying and, if for the Peak Bagger award, to classify it. After the Unit completes this peak climb, it is requested that a detailed itinerary and appropriate recommendations be sent to the GLAAC-HAT to assist it in future evaluations of qualified peaks and routes.



Obtaining Awards

When all of the requirements for a GLAAC-HAT sponsored High Adventure award have been completed, it may be obtained by preparing the appropriate application and getting any required approvals. All application forms can be found at the GLAAC-HAT web site.

Award Required form(s) Purchase at
Backpacking High Adventure Award Application,
Trail Profile/Schedule
Scout Shop
Mini-Peak Bagging High Adventure Award Application,
Mini-Peak Bagger Award Record
Scout Shop
Peak Bagging High Adventure Award Application,
Peak Bagger Award Record
Scout Shop
TrailSaver,
ForestSaver
Conservation Award Log Scout Shop
Trail Boss Service Pin,
Master TrailBuilder
Presented by the Forest/Trail Conservation Committee of the GLAAC-HAT, on the basis of its records of Trail Boss activity.
Jim Spencer Conservation Award Jim Spencer Conservation Award Application GLAAC-HAT Chair
Rock Climbing High Adventure Award Application,
See the award description for additional required information.
Scout Shop
Backpacker,
Advanced Backpacker
Backpacker Award Application Scout Shop
Silver Moccasins Medal High Adventure Award Application,
Conservation Award Log
Cashier/receptionist
Lyle N. Whited Hiking Award High Adventure Award Application,
Lyle N. Whited Hiking Award Application
Cashier/receptionist
50-Miler 50-Miler Award Application (National award) Scout Shop
Historic Trails Historic Trails Award Application (National award) Scout Shop
Jim Hawkins Mountaineering High Adventure Award Application,
Jim Hawkins Mountaineering Award Application
Scout Shop
One-time awards One-time awards, by their nature, generally are obtained by using a separate process. See the announcement of the award for the required form and availability of the award.

Scout Shop: Cushman Watt Scout Center
Scout Shop
2333 Scout Way
Los Angeles, CA 90026
(213) 353-9879
Cashier/receptionist: Cushman Watt Scout Center
Just outside the Scout Shop
2333 Scout Way
Los Angeles, CA 90026
(213) 413-4400 x366


Integrity of the Awards

A High Adventure patch is awarded to an individual to recognize his/her accomplishment. Giving out an award on any other basis cheapens it and demeans the accomplishments of those who have earned it. It is a matter of trust, the first Scout Law, and it is assumed that the Unit Leadership will follow this basic rule.

It is very easy to obtain any award, for any person. All that is needed is to prepare all of the required paperwork. The Unit members are normally the only ones who will know whether or not an outing was actually taken, a summit was actually reached, or an award recipient had actually met all of the requirements. High Adventure awards are never given or received on a complimentary or best-effort basis, they are earned by meeting all of the award requirements.

Therefore, it should be understood that these awards are not to be traded. The pride that goes with having earned them should keep most recipients from doing so. On the other hand, a patch not earned should have little interest to a Scout or Scouter who knows the meaning and value of earning it.



Displaying Awards

High Adventure awards are not a part of the Official Boy Scout uniform. Because of this, they are not, with notable exceptions, worn on it, per BSA-National Council policy. The Silver Moccasins Medal, as a temporary patch, may be hung from the button for the right shirt pocket. The Backpacker or Advanced Backpacker award, as a temporary patch, and the Silver Moccasins, the TrailSaver, and the ForestSaver Medals, sponsored by the GLAAC-HAT, may be worn on the Scout shirt. All other High Adventure awards of the GLAAC-HAT are to be displayed on a "brag rag", or in some other manner. Only one High Adventure award may be worn on the Scout shirt at any given time.

Patches are sometimes sewn to the backpack or pack cover. This has the disadvantage of degrading the waterproofing of these items. It also subjects the patches to dirt, moisture, abrasion, and possible loss. A "brag rag", which can be attached to a backpack or separately displayed on an appropriate occasion, is an excellent way to protect and show the awards.



Other Council Award Programs

As mentioned earlier, the other Councils of the Southern California and adjacent areas sponsor many, many High Adventure awards, to encourage backpacking, rafting, bicycling, soaring, peak climbing, conservation work, and other outdoor activities. Practically all of them may be earned by members of your Unit. These awards are recognized by the Greater Los Angeles Area Council and most may be obtained through the Scout Shop in the Cushman Watt Scout Center.

As with awards that are sponsored by the GLAAC-HAT, it is imperative that the Unit Leadership learn all of the requirements for the award and then satisfy them before applying for it. If the award is new to the Unit, it would be prudent to contact the sponsoring Council before the activity and request a copy of the current requirements. Some of these awards do not recognize 1,000 feet of elevation gain as an equivalent to two miles of backpacking, for example. There may be other differences in computing mileage, qualifying nights of camping, etc. All of these matters are at the discretion of the sponsor of the award.

Any deviation to a requirement for an award must be granted by the sponsoring Council. The GLAAC-HAT will only approve a request for a deviation for an award which it sponsors. Certain awards must be approved by, and obtained directly from, the sponsor Councils. The GLAAC-HAT and the Scout Shop can be of some assistance, but the Unit will have to deal directly with that Council to obtain one of these "controlled" awards.



BSA-National Council Awards

To further its objective to promote a challenging outdoor program, the BSA-National Council sponsors several on-going awards and, periodically, limited-time ones. It establishes the requirements for earning and the method for obtaining them, often by the use of a special application form. Information about them and the patches are available at the Scout Shop. Scouting magazine prints the announcement of a special award as it is offered.

The GLAAC-HAT has no direct involvement with these awards and its approval is not required to earn them. It does, however, encourage Units to be aware of them and, particularly, to earn the unique limited-time ones. The rule that only one award may be earned for any outdoor activity applies also to these BSA-National Council awards. A Unit that earns one may not apply for any other award that is sponsored by the GLAAC-HAT, or any other local Council, for the same outing.

The 50-Miler Program (see the National BSA web site at http://www.scouting.org) has an award that may be earned for any 50 mile trek, including those taken at Philmont and Northern Tier, the BSA High Adventure Bases. Neither the trek nor the conservation work requires GLAAC-HAT involvement or approval. However, it can help arrange for conservation work in the Angeles National Forest. This is an High Adventure award that a person should be proud to display.

The Historic Trails Program (see the National BSA web site at http://www.scouting.org) requires the Unit to research an historic trail or site, ideally through a local historical society. There are numerous such sites, and a few trails, throughout Southern California, although many may not be suitable for overnight camping. The basic purpose of the program, however, is not High Adventure but the performance of some activity to enhance the site or trail. A Unit that desires to earn the award should consider contacting an historical society and working with it to identify a site or trail and to conduct an activity that qualifies for it. The Mt. Lowe Tavern site and trail network qualifies and the GLAAC-HAT can arrange for a Unit to do conservation work in this area.

Hornaday Awards are granted to recognize exceptional and distinguished service in conservation by individuals and Units. A discussion of them can be found at the National BSA web site (http://www.scouting.org). These awards may be sought in addition to obtaining the applicable award(s) for the conservation project work, as offered by the GLAAC and other local Councils.



Record Keeping

While never high on anyone's list of enjoyable activities, record keeping is a necessary and important part of a Unit's High Adventure program. It is desirable for each member of the Unit to keep his/her own records of participation in High Adventure activities and to advise the Unit Leadership of having satisfied the requirements for High Adventure awards and merit badges. However, it has been found that the most effective approach is for the Unit to have a centralized record keeping system. Such a system reduces the confusion and uncertainty about individual participation in activities and eligibility for awards, and ensures that all members are properly and promptly recognized for their High Adventure achievements.

Sample forms for recording participation in various types of outdoor activities are available on our web site at http://glaac-hat.org/ApplicationForms.html. Feel free to download them, if they meet your needs; or, amend them to better suit your Unit's program. The objective is to keep and maintain accurate records of these activities. These records are important to supporting your applications for High Adventure awards. You may want to clip a copy to the required form.

Please note that these records cover those Scouting activities in which the person has participated while a member of your Unit. Activities undertaken on a personal basis or before or after the person's registration with the Boy Scouts of America do not qualify towards earning GLAAC-HAT sponsored High Adventure awards.



Questions/Comments

The members of the GLAAC-HAT are available to assist you in all matters regarding High Adventure activities. The easiest way to get in touch with the High Adventure Team is via the Contact Us page on our web site (http://glaac-hat.org/Contact.html). Questions in general, or about specific requirements for an award may be submitted there.

The GLAAC-HAT encourages your suggestions and comments about these awards, including proposals for new awards and for revisions to current awards. As stated at the beginning of this Hike Aid, the primary purpose of the High Adventure Awards Program is to stimulate interest and participation in a variety of High Adventure activities. You can help us make improvements to better achieve this goal.